John Howard wants gun laws in Australia ‘strengthened’

FORMER prime minister John Howard has said Australia’s gun laws could be “strengthened” after he revealed he didn’t want to see the laws he introduced “weakened”.

Mr Howard, who was attending centenary celebrations at Earlwood Public School in Sydney, was asked about the Adler shotgun controversy that arose in federal parliament this week.

“My position as you might expect on gun laws is I don’t want to see any weakening of any kind in the prohibitions that I introduced and amendments which may have been added since 1996,” Mr Howard said.

After speaking at the school’s event, Mr Howard told reporters that the gun laws had made Australia safer as a country.

He added that while the current state of the laws was a matter for the Turnbull Governmet to deal with, he said the laws his government introduced back in 1996 were also well respected worldwide.

“Now as to how the government of the day deals with the current issue that’s a matter for the government of the day,” he said.

“But my principle as everybody would accept and expect is I don’t want to see any weakening of our gun laws.

“They are respected around the world as being very effective, they have made Australia a much safer country and I just don’t want to see any weakening, and where the opportunity might arise, they could even be strengthened.”

The controversial rapid-fire Adler A-110 shotgun looks unlikely to be allowed into Australia for some time after the nation’s state police ministers failed to reach an agreement on its reclassification.

 The controversial rapid-fire Adler A-110 shotgun looks unlikely to be allowed into Australia for some time after the nation’s state police ministers failed to reach an agreement on its reclassification.

The Adler A-110 is currently in the same class as an air rifle but the federal government has put its importation on hold until the states can all agree on how to tighten its classification.

NSW has refused to go along with the rest of the states, which called for a ‘D’ classification — which would make it available only to military and police instead of farmers and sporting shooters.

The Adler A-110 is currently in the same class as an air rifle but the federal government has put its importation on hold until the states can all agree on how to tighten its classification.

NSW has refused to go along with the rest of the states, which called for a ‘D’ classification — which would make it available only to military and police instead of farmers and sporting shooters.

x

Check Also

Real Housewives of Orange County’s Shannon Beador Addresses Weight Gain Ahead of Season 12 Premiere

Shannon Beador is taking control of her ...

How a Game of Thrones Star Almost Got Herself Fired

Spoilers are a precious commodity in ...

Jerry Ferrara and Breanne Racano’s Bora Bora Honeymoon Is Pretty Picturesque

Jerry Ferrara has come a long way ...

Hilary Duff Packs on the PDA at the Beach With Ely Sandvik

The 29-year-old actress was spotted packing ...

Breaking Down the Cost of Julianne Hough’s Idaho Wedding

Julianne Hough‘s wedding to NHL star Brooks Laich was ...

Will & Grace’s New Teaser Has the Gang Up to Their Old Tricks

Jack, Karen, Will and Grace are ...